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Good things happen when residents help decide how their nursing home should be run!

Intiating a full-blown person-centered caring program has made for happy residents and staff at this nursing home!

Beth Baker, a nationally published writer who specializes in aging topics has posted a blog telling of the benefits of using person-centered care at the St. Camillus Health Center in Whitinsville, Mass.

Her blog appears on www.nextavenue.org, which is a part of the Public Broadcasting System. (PBS.)

It's titled: "What if Residents Decided How Their Nursing Home Would Run?"
In her blog, she tells of residents who would rather stay at the nursing home than move closer to relatives. One says, "In no way would I leave."

She explained that she loved the freedom at the facility, and that "the meals are great, and if you don't like them, you can get whatever you want. You can go to bed whenever you want, and get up whenever you want."
St. Camillus, says Baker, "prides itself in delivering person-centered care, considered to be the gold standard by medical and aging professionals."
Staff at the facility said they provide person-centered care by responding to each individual's specific needs. They added that they developed their person-centered program by listening to advice from staff and residents, and structuring their program around that input. And staffers who were initially opposed to the changes to person-centered care, now say they much prefer the current resident-centered system.

In recent years, there's been a big push toward getting person-centered care in as many longterm care facilities as possible, with many organizations such as the Pioneer Network, Eden Alternative, and others leading the way.

Here's the link to Baker's blog, where you can read a lot more about the benefits of person-centered caregiving. What if patients decided how their nursing home would run.

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